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Calipers are used to measure the distance between two opposing sides of an object in a variety of ways. These great devices come in a range of types, with three very common versions—Vernier caliper, digital caliper, and dial caliper. A Vernier caliper is the most common of all, and the most precise. A Vernier caliper includes a built in Vernier scale, which is a visual aid that indicates specific gradations between measurement marks. Utilizing a Vernier scale for measurement allows for an incredible degree of accuracy. A digital caliper is distinguished by the digital readout screen that displays the final measurement after the caliper has been adjusted appropriately.

Finally, a dial caliper is built with a small dial in place of the Vernier scale. The dial is rotated when taking a measurement and the final number will be in millimeters or inches, as read along the manual scale provided.

There are two main references to set when using a height gage: the internal zero and the ball diameter. A couple of key checks to run initially when setting these references are very important. First make sure that the surface plate used to set the internal zero is completely clean of any debris or dust; same goes for the ball. Second, make sure that both the surface plate and the ball are securely attached to the height gage and not at all loose. Both of these could interfere with the precision of your measurements. In order to set the internal zero of the surface plate, lower the sensing head and touch it to the plate. This will then be your baseline zero for any further measurements. Setting the reference of the diameter of the ball is equally important. The standardized text fixture and routine that accompanies your height gage should be utilized to set this reference point. As an extra precaution, the process of setting each of these reference points could be repeated a few times to ensure precision.
A telescopic bore gage measures the size of a bore through indirect methods. Essentially, the telescopic bore gage is used to take the size of a bore, and then an external tool, such as a caliper or a micrometer, is used to measure the output of the gage. The head of the bore gage is extended at an angle within the bore and locked into place. The extended head is the part that is measured to get the final output. Very similar to inside calipers, which can also be used to measure bore diameter, telescopic bore gages have the added advantage of being able to be locked in place during the measurement process, thus ensuring higher accuracy. Telescopic bore gages are used by mechanics and anyone in metrology that needs to find the interior diameter, radius, or circumferences of a pipe or a hole.

The Vyndicator Wireless Test Indicator consists of a transmitter and a receiver. The transmitter uses an attached stylus to send signals back to the receiver through a microprocessor connected to a sensor. Another microprocessor is located in the receiver, which decodes the signals sent from the transmitter. All of these relayed messages contain information regarding any movement of the stylus. The receiver then displays decoded information on its OLED display in regard to these movements, allowing the operator to complete necessary adjustments. A horizontal bar across the bottom of the receiver display represents the amount of distance the stylus moves, supplementing the numerical information provided.

Hardness, strength, and toughness are very similar concepts, but come with important distinctions. Hardness is simply the degree of resistance to deformation. Alternatively, strength refers to the amount of elasticity and plasticity of a material. In other words, how much can a material temporarily change shape (elasticity) and how much can a material permanently change shape without any damage (plasticity). These qualities in combination make strength. Toughness, then, is the greatest amount of energy that a material is able to absorb before breaking. This is distinct from hardness because hardness references the amount of force that can be applied before a change in structure. Toughness has to do with how much energy can be taken in by the material before a fracture occurs, and is sort of the opposing feature to hardness.
There are no set of rules or regulations that exist defining how often a gage needs to be calibrated. Ultimately, the frequency of gage calibration is up to the company or facility owner or manager. While some believe that annual calibration is a good rule to live by, there are resources at stake that must be considered. Calibrating one gage or multiple gages too often will waste a large amount of time and money. However, on the other hand, not calibrating a gage that needs it will result in poor accuracy. Calibration should definitely be done in regular intervals, but the definition of regular will vary based on the drift and use of a particular machine. Using historical trend analysis can help determine what gages require more frequent calibration and when to expect that they will need to be calibrated.

No. Accuracy is different from resolution and in precision measurement it is important to know what they both are. The resolution of a gage is the degree to which the output of measurement can be broken down, whether in decimal places, parts, divisions, or counts. The smaller degree to which a gage is capable of making a measurement, the higher its resolution. Alternatively, accuracy is how close the output of a measurement is to the actual true value of the measurement. In other words, the less error there is in a particular measurement, the higher the accuracy of that measurement. A high functioning gage requires both resolution and accuracy—you need one to have the other.

No. Precision is different from resolution, just as accuracy is. The resolution of a gage is the degree to which the output of measurement can be broken down, whether in decimal places, parts, divisions, or counts. Precision relates to the resolution, but takes it a step further. The precision of a gage is the smallest (resolution), true (accuracy) measurement that can be taken repeatedly and reliably. The more precise a gage is, the greater its ability to take finely-tuned and accurate measurements again and again. While a gage might take the perfect measurement once, what you really want is to be confident that the gage will take as close to the perfect measurement as possible, every time—this is precision.

Yes, there are many kinds of micrometers out there. Some are basic micrometers, while others are specialized micrometers for particular jobs or measurements. What makes each micrometer unique is the kind of measurement purpose it serves. Universal micrometers are built with parts that can be swapped out depending on the job at hand. Blade micrometers, pitch-diameter micrometers, bore micrometers, tube micrometers, and bail micrometers are just few examples of micrometers with specialized parts that identify them for particular measurement goals. Digit micrometers use mechanical digit markers that roll and tell the measurement, whereas digital micrometers have an internal encoder that reports the measurement on a readable screen.

It is completely normal for a micrometer to become un-calibrated. This is easily fixed by just recalibrating it. Often, you will be able to zero a micrometer by using a small pin spanner that adjusts the sleeve in order to realign its zero line with the zero line on the thimble. Once this adjustment has been made, you can double-check the accuracy of your micrometer by adjusting it such that the anvil and the spindle faces are touching, and seeing that the micrometer reads zero. Another way in which to test the accuracy of your micrometer is to measure a standardized item, like a gauge block or rod, for which you already know the exact measurement.

The resolution of your gage is pivotal to respectable measurement. In today’s world, technology is advancing at lightning speed. While there are bigger, more obvious ways in which this impacts the field of measurement, it also has a great impact on the smaller things too. The modern gage can be built to have an incredible degree of resolution. While a gage is used to conduct precision measurement on both small- and large-scale projects, this high resolution should never be sacrificed. The resolution of your gage is important in every practical setting because it directly impacts the accuracy of your measurement. Every project and measurement you take part in ought to value accuracy, and having high resolution is how this is done. No matter how basic the application, the technological advances that allow for incredibly precise measurement capabilities ought to be taken advantage of by all.

The TESA height gages by Brown & Sharpe are compatible with a number of different accessories. From panels and printers to probe holders, they come with it al. No matter the job you need to get done and the individualization your height gage requires, the Brown & Sharpe height gage can be built or adjusted to match. We have a number of probes with all sorts of fixations, shapes, and sizes. There are ball, disc, cone, shaft, cylindrical, and barrel probes. A special feature of the Brown & Sharpe height gage is its ability to measure both straightness and perpendicularity. You can easily attain these squareness measurements by utilizing the available accessories. Finally, the accessories come in different sets in order to maximize the efficiency of your purchase. The accessories that are compatible with Brown & Sharpe height gages reach far and wide. Call us at higher precision today to learn more about each of our height gage accessories.

The main advantages of the Fowler QuadraTest Electronic Test Indicator over older dial style indicators relate to the way in which the measurement data is recorded, stored, and transmitted. From the initial step of taking the measurement, the electronic indicator will give a precise measurement without risk of a human misreading the dial. That data point can then be transmitted electronically, further removing any possible error made by a person reading the number and transcribing it incorrectly. All of the data points measured by the electronic indicator are easily sent and stored on a computer, formatted for any analysis that will occur. All of this results in much faster measurements, guaranteed to be more exact. Finally, the Fowler QuadraTest Electronic Test Indicator has the capability to switch back and forth between metric and inch units. This prevents error and enormously speeds of the process of changing or updating the data. Overall, the digital test indicators exhibit an increased amount of control over the measurement process.

Hardness can be measured in a number of ways, and often you will want to choose a particular measurement tool or scale based on the type of hardness you need to assess. We will review a few of the more commonly used tests. The Brinell Hardness Test applies a hard metal ball to the material being tested from a vertical angle, using a known amount of force, for a specified amount of time. The degree of hardness is determined from the pressure diameter and the force applied. The Vickers Hardness Test uses a pyramid-shaped diamond indenter to make an indentation on the test material. Hardness is then measured using the diagonals of the resulting indentation. The Rockwell Hardness Test uses a diamond cone or steel ball to make an indentation on the material being tested. A number is then calculated using the resulting depth.

Before the invention of the Vyndicator Wireless Test Indicator there were a number of cumbersome and dangerous jobs that can now be accomplished by this amazing measurement tool. These indicators can be used for standard quality control functions, to make sure that machines are well aligned. Beam deflections and shaft alignment can also be tackled by the Vyndicator Wireless Test Indicator. Machine debugging and repeatability, milling machine centering operations, and deep hole boring operations each come much easier with this useful tool available. Finally, the Vyndicator Wireless Test Indicator can even serve the purpose of replacing coaxial indicators.

Indicators are used in a number of different industries including machining, manufacturing, fabricating, and science. A Fowler QuadraTest Electronic Test Indicator might be used to assess run-out of an automotive disc brake, when working to fit a new disc. These indicators can be used to run quality checks regarding consistency and accuracy in manufacturing projects. Another application is initial or re-calibration of a machine before use in a production line, or testing accuracy of a tool in a tool production company. Also, many physics experiments and projects require the precise measurements offered by electronic test indicators.

If you are using an electronic height gage, it will be capable of transmitting measurement information to a computer. However, some height gages go beyond this maneuver and are hooked up to the computer through a wireless connection. For a successful wireless set up with your height gage, you need a transmitter and a receiver, just like you do for wireless internet. The major advantage of wireless communication with height gages is that it eliminates the nuisance of having a wire connecting the tool to the computer and getting in the way of the operator. One potential risk of working with a wireless height gage is that there may be signal interference, or a problem with the transmission of the measurement information. However, the modern wireless height gage is advanced to handle this risk and is well-equipped to protect against any interference. Additionally, wireless transmission eliminates possible transcription errors, keyboard mistakes, missing data, and any number of other manual issues with data coding.

The probes available as accessories to the TESA height gage by Brown & Sharpe include ball probes, disc probes, cone probes, shaft probes, cylindrical probes, and barrel probes. The most common type of probe used with height gages is the ball probe. These come prepackaged with each height gage. Typically used in order to complete bore measurements or to probe centering shoulders and grooves, disc probes are excellent to have around. Cone probes are made to position nicely at the center of a bore and can be used to find their location. Measuring grooves, blind bores, and centering shoulders can best be accomplished by shaft probes. Finally, probes that are cylindrical or barrel in shape are ideal when measuring elements that are more difficult to tackle using a standard ball-shaped probe.

Calipers are capable of measuring in four ways: 1) outside diameter, 2) inside diameter, 3) depth distance, and 4) step distance. Whether you have a Vernier, a digital, or a dial caliper, you will be able to complete all four of these potential measurements. Outside diameter measurement assesses the distance from one edge of an object to another using the outside dimensions. Inside diameter measurement looks at the distance between two inside points of a space or hole. Depth distance measurement provides the distance to the bottom of a space or hole. Finally, step distance measures the distance between an upper and lower step of an object. Calipers are incredibly useful because they can accomplish each of these different measurements. These highly adaptable tools are a great asset to any precision measurement workshop.
The first level of electronic height gage functions very similarly to a mechanical height gage. They will have a comparable level of accuracy to a mechanical height gage. Additionally, these will include both a floating and an absolute zero, data output, and data unit conversion. The second level of electronic height gage builds upon the first group. This level will have an increased degree of accuracy, and might possibly come with more advanced features. Some of these features could include a tolerance setting, a maximum and minimum setting, TIR compensation, ID/OD measurement, or a probe compensation. Finally, the third level of electronic height gage contains all of the features of the first and second level, with higher accuracy and more features. The additional features you will likely see in this group are a motorized touch probe, a computer interface, air bearings, and the ability to store part programs.
Hardness in general is the amount of resistance a material has to any kind of deformation from an outside source. The three main types of hardness include: indentation hardness, scratch hardness, and rebound hardness. Indentation hardness is the resistance a material has to deformation from a consistently applied force. The higher the indentation hardness, the greater ability to not have any resulting deformation from applied compression. Scratch hardness is the degree of resistance one material has when it is subjected to friction caused by another material. Materials that are less impacted by this scratching will have higher scratch hardness. Finally, rebound hardness is the amount of bounce that occurs when an outside object is dropped on the material in question. Often tested with a diamond-tipped hammer, a material with higher rebound hardness will lead to a higher bounce when the hammer is dropped.

The Vyndicator Wireless Test Indicator comes with a wide breadth of features. To start, the wireless remote reading of this tool makes it stand out from its competitors. The first of its kind, this indicator seamlessly transmits measurements to the receiver wirelessly, making reading the movement of the stylus easy. The receiver provides read-out in most English and Metric modes, using a bright OLED display that is easy to read. The mounting VEES is the standard in precision measurement industry, and this indicator operates on batteries. The measure modes include Standard, TIR, Low and High, and this handy little tool is capable of using multiple units in the same area. There is a moving bar on the receiver that shows any stylus movement, and the stylus itself is reversible and comes in 4 different lengths.

The lifetime warranty can be applied to a subset of amazing Fowler and Sylvac metrology products. Certain calipers, indicators, and micrometers all fall under the warranty. These highly utilized precision measurement tools are fundamental to any measurement process. Fowler wanted to show that their products can stand the test of time, and are doing just that by backing each of them with the new lifetime warranty. The specific products available with the lifetime warranty include: Mark VI Electronic Indicators (with Integrated Bluetooth Technology or with Analog display), the Ultra-Cal V Electronic Caliper, and the Rapid-Mic Electronic Micrometer. Each of these tools come in a range of sizes and models and every one of them can be covered with a lifetime warranty.

The TESA Micro-Hite height gage by Brown & Sharpe is used in all kinds of metrology and a number of different industries. Mainly, these include automobile, moulds and tooling, medical, or plasturgy industries. In the automobile industry, height gages might be used to measure injection systems, brake systems, or engine components to ensure quality and precise design. The complexity and exactitude involved in moulds and tooling requires an excellent machine such as the Brown & Sharpe height gage. These height gages are vital to measuring various molds and tools that are then used to create millions of copies of different foods, aeronautics, cosmetics, etc. The standards set within the medical field are very high, and the controlled nature of medical devices and tools is very strict, since their eventual use involves high risks and high rewards. Brown & Sharpe height gages are built for excellence, and come equipped with the high-level analytic capabilities, regulatory compliance, and measurement precision that are imperative to the medical industry. The variability of plastic development and the regularity of product within the plasturgy industry is the perfect place to see the Brown & Sharpe height gage shine. This tool has the validity and stability that is essential to all processes in working with plastics.

The zero error on a caliper has to do with the baseline point of the caliper. If properly cleaned and closed, a caliper ought to measure 0.00 exactly. Occasionally, this will not be the case and then you have a zero error. A zero error on a caliper can be positive or negative in direction. A positive zero error occurs when the caliper jaws are closed, but the readout has some positive value, whereas a negative zero error occurs when the caliper jaws are closed, but the readout has some negative value. This can occur when a caliper is not properly maintained, or after normal wear and tear from use. No matter the cause, a zero error occurs when the caliper is not properly calibrated to the zero point. Knowing if your caliper has a zero error is extremely important for the accuracy of your measurement. If there is any discrepancy in the calibration of your caliper, you must then account for it in your final measurement.

Measurement conflict resolution, sometimes called measurement dispute resolution, is when a suppler and a user disagree on the finite measurement of a gage or precision measurement instrument. Such conflicts can gravely impact relationships within the field. Most experts suggest that having methods in place ahead of time to resolve any measurement conflicts can lead to a quicker and more satisfactory resolution. Vermont Gage subscribes to the methods used by the American Measuring Tool Manufacturers Association (AMTMA). These methods include “The Referee Method” and “The Universal Standard Method.” The Referee Method involves an uninvolved third party taking a measurement of the disputed part or tool that will then serve as the agreed upon true measurement by both disputing parties. The Universal Standard Method involves focusing on uncertainty budgets of the involved parties. In this method it is up to the party questioning the validity of the measurement to present their uncertainty budget to the opposing party with the goal being to resolve that incorrect parts of one budget with the correct parts of the other.

While different experts in the field of metrology have differing opinions on how often gages need to be calibrated, one thing is agreed upon—there must be some sort of calibration schedule. One potential solution to regular gage calibration is to create a gage control program. Very simply, a gage control program is a systematized way to determine how often a gage requires recalibration. The central goal of a gage control program is to create a document that names each gage, records the intervals of calibration, and classifies the gage within a bigger system of groups defining when calibration will occur. This document then allows you to see when a particular gage was last calibrated, how often it has been calibrated over time, how frequently it is utilized, and who is charge of maintaining its use.
Just like everything Fowler High Precision makes, the new lifetime warranty is innovative and unmatched. For 68 years Fowler has made the highest quality metrology products available, and it is about time they backed them up with an amazing offer like a lifetime warranty. This warranty truly covers you and your precision measurement tool for life. Accuracy and dependability are givens when it comes to any of the Fowler measurement products, so why not make them even more reliable with a lifetime warranty. These warranties are on certain products only and available through only a select group of premier distributers. The Fowler lifetime warranty is special because it is a bond of trust between Fowler and each customer who gets one. Call your Fowler distributer today to learn more.

Small hole bore gages come in two main types: full-ball and half-ball bore gages. The terms full- and half-ball refer to the end of the bore gage that is inserted into the bore to complete the measurement. This end is typically opposite to the knurled knob used for setting the anvils. Full-ball small hole gages are generally simpler to set the anvils on and lock into place. More often than not, these bore gages will provide a more accurate and precise measurement of a bore. Half-ball gages are more prone to springing during measurement and require a more experienced user. Half-ball bore gages are more likely to result in an inaccurate measurement. However, some machinists prefer half-ball bore gages because they allow the user more control and leave room for adjustment in unusual measurement circumstances.

Originally founded in 1968, Vermont Precision Tools, Inc. specializes in the production of knock-out pins, ejector pins, perforators, special punches, and all round and ground pins. They service cold heading and power metal industries specifically. Vermont Gage was formed twelve years later in 1980 as a specialized gage manufacturing division of Vermont Precision Tools, Inc. Today, Vermont Gage is the proud manufacturer of a large selection of gage pins and sets, Class X gages, taperlock gages, ring gages, and thread ring gages. An astounding 98% of the products sold by Vermont Gage are manufactured by the company itself. The main manufacturing facility is located in Swanton, VT with a thread gage manufacturing plant located in Franklin, KY. Both facilities are built with state-of-the-art equipment. Vermont Gage prides itself on its high quality products, its competitive prices, its technical expertise, its innovative marketing, and its partnerships with distributers and users alike.

The total indicator reading (TIR), sometimes called total indicator run-out (TIR) mentioned for the Fowler QuadraTest Electronic Test Indicator refers to the difference between minimum and maximum measurement. In other words, the TIR measures the amount of deviation from whatever the targeted structure is (flatness, concentricity, cylindricity, roundness). The TIR is the value measured about a particular reference axis. TIR is highly important in preventing excessing stress, premature wear, and a failing system. This is because TIR assesses whether the central axis that is being measured is unequal in direction and/or angle.

Vermont Gage maintains a highly-regarded quality policy for all that they do. The main goal of this policy is to achieve and even exceed the satisfaction of each individual customer. Vermont Gage vows to provide both services and products that meet agreed-upon specifications and are delivered in a timely manner. Additionally, the quality policy covers speedy and responsive customer service. Through a company-wide commitment to a constant focus on improvement, Vermont Gage uses its quality policy to focus on teamwork, empowerment, and quality. The implementation of the policy occurs under the quality management system through the ISO 9001-2008 certification, as well as through the ISO 13485:2003 certification that covers all medical device quality management.

Right from their website, Vermont Gage offers a 120-page catalogue full of their amazing products. They sell plain plug gages including Class ZZ and Class X standards, as we as custom reversible, taperlocks, trilocks, and progressives. Vermont gage sells plain ring gages, maters, hole location gages, threat gages, and blanks. In addition to this, Vermont Gage has a wide selection of precision measurement accessories including gage handles, gage holders, bushings, boxes, and inserts. Beyond all of these top-notch supplies, Vermont Gage also offers common services to customers. The services offered include: calibrations, measurement conflict resolution, depth notches and pressure relief flats, and gage fact sheets. Contact Vermont Gage for a custom quote today.

Human error is unavoidable in any profession. Similarly, in precision measurement, the height gage operator is a crucial factor in its accuracy and success. This is particularly salient when an operator is working with a manual height gage. The speed and pressure with which a part is touched onto a height gage can significantly alter the outcome of the measurement and introduce variability. Due to this potential for error, operators must go through very regimented and precise training in order to properly learn how to operate a manual height gage. The icons on a height gage have been specifically developed to be intuitive and instructive for use in order to aid the operation of the height gage. Finally, the more electronic the height gage, the less pressure that falls onto the operator, resulting in the minimization of error in accuracy due to operator involvement.

Micrometers are certainly built to last, but that does not mean that you should skip these quick and simple steps to make them last even longer. First and foremost, take care to not drop your micrometer, or slam it down on any surface. This could impact its measurement accuracy. If you do accidentally drop it, make sure to recheck the calibration before using it for measurements. Another important habit to develop is to wipe down your micrometer on a regular basis. Particularly, you want to wipe the measurement faces in order to ensure that no dirt or build up impacts your measurement. Use a dry, lint-free cloth to do this. Also using a lint-free cloth, wipe your micrometer with a very small amount of oil after long periods of non-use or storage. This will help to avoid the build up of rust or other corrosive mater. When storing your micrometer, keep it in a place that is as close to room temperature as possible, with as low humidity as possible. This will help prevent warping of any sort. Finally, when your micrometer is not in use leave a gap between the anvil face and the spindle face. Prolonged contact between the two faces could lead to a less accurate measurement.

A man named William Gascoigne invented the very first micrometer in the 1600s. This micrometer was used to measure the distance between stars through a telescope, and to estimate the size of various celestial objects. Later, in the 1800s, Henry Maudslay upgraded the micrometer to a version built for mechanical use. This tool was made to be durable as well as accurate. Then, later in the 19th century, Jean Palmer created a handheld version of the micrometer, making it much more accessible and popular in industrial fields. The micrometer at the time represented an excellent pairing of technology and science. Today, the micrometer remains one of the most important tools in the industrial world, having many applications and reporting consistent and trusted measurements.

Gage calibration can be done by the owner or facility manager him or herself, it can be outsourced to a commercial calibration service, or it can be done by the original manufacturer who built the gage. There are pros and cons to each. Doing the calibration in-house can be a huge investment to set up the facilities, but can also save time and money. Outsourcing can guarantee that specialists complete the calibration, but can lead to long turnaround time. Going back to the manufacturer ensures that the gage is in the same setting it was originally built and tested in, but can also add to the time or cost of moving the machine. Usually, gage owners will use a mix of these three options dependent upon the work that needs to be done and the speed with which it needs to be done.

The type of bore gage required will vary depending on the measurement job at hand, as well as on the preference of the user. Dial bore gages are often an excellent choice when needing to conduct a highly precise measurement of a bore. The biggest benefit of the dial bore gage is that it does not require the transferring of the measurement to another tool (micrometer or caliper), but rather has a built in mechanism so that a bore can be measured directly. In general, dial bore gages are both highly accurate and highly fast. Additionally, a dial bore gage comes in handy if the user needs to assess a bore for wearing or tapering that could impact the roundness and symmetry of the bore. Dial bore gages come with a very high resolution, usually reaching an accuracy of 1/100 of a millimeter or 5/10,000 of an inch.

Fowler High Precision is a company that is run on genuineness, innovation, and quality. When they decided to put a lifetime warranty on some of their products, it was most important that they knew which products deserved such a no nonsense label. After extensive research and testing, Fowler chose the products covered by the new lifetime warranty with confidence. Precision measurement tools undergo a normal amount of wear and tear overtime. With this in mind, Fowler wanted to emphasize the importance of the quality in their products and are doing so by offering a lifetime warranty on a particular subset. Keep an eye out for new developments on what might be backed with a lifetime warranty in the future!
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